Perspectives on the use of aromatherapy from clinicians attending an integrative medicine continuing education event

Pearson ACS, Cutshall SM, Hooten WM, Rodgers NJ, Bauer BA, Bhagra A
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine,
2019


ABSTRACT:

BACKGROUND: The use of essential oils is growing in the United States, but clinician attitudes, experience, and beliefs regarding their use have not previously been studied.

METHODS: One hundred five of 106 clinician attendees (99.1%) of an integrative medicine continuing education conference were surveyed using an audience response system to obtain baseline information. Response frequencies of each item were reported. Nonparametric correlations were assessed comparing the statement “In the last 12 months, I have used essential oils for myself and/or my family” with the other agree/disagree statements using Spearman’s rho.

RESULTS: A majority of participants personally used integrative medicine approaches other than aromatherapy (92.6%) and recommended them clinically (96.8%). Most had personally used essential oils (61%) and wished to offer essential oil recommendations or therapies to their patients (74.0%). Only 21.9% felt confident in their ability to counsel patients on safe use. Personal use of essential oils was highly correlated with confidence in the ability to counsel patients on safe use (Spearman coefficient 0.376, P = 0.000).

CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that clinicians interested in integrative medicine desire to provide aromatherapy recommendations, but do not feel confident in their ability to do so.

CITATION:

Pearson ACS, Cutshall SM, Hooten WM, Rodgers NJ, Bauer BA, Bhagra A. Perspectives on the use of aromatherapy from clinicians attending an integrative medicine continuing education event. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2019;19(1):174.


 
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